The director of the first ever episode of Doctor Who has made his feelings known about the modern version of the show – saying it is ‘too sexy’ and lacks the air of mystery.

Waris Hussein, who helmed the 1963 shows with first Doctor William Hartnell, cited the ‘sea change’ of the sci-fi adventure during BBC Radio 4’s show The Reunion – which also featured former cast members Peter Purves and Carole Ann Ford.

And he said the change had been particularly noticeable with the arrival of Jenna-Louise Coleman as new companion Clara Oswald.

“There is an element now, and I know we’re living in a different era, of sexuality that has crept in,” Waris said.

“The intriguing thing about the original person was that you never quite knew about him and there was a mystery and an unavailability about him. Now we’ve just had a recent rebirth and another girl has joined us, a companion, she actually snogged him.”

He added that the Doctor should be “unavailable”, comparing him to Sherlock Holmes, and adding: “Why bring in this element when in fact you needn’t have it there?”

Peter Purves – who appeared in Doctor Who as sidekick Steven Taylor, and later went on to co-host Blue Peter, voiced his agreement – and also complained about the recent complicated storylines.

“The original series was so simple. They were very straightforward, nice linear stories that one could follow,” he said.

The second episode in the current run of shows, The Rings Of Akhaten, was screened on BBC One on Saturday night.