Julian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey, said he would be more than happy to write a movie version of the multi-award-winning ITV drama.

Speaking in an interview with ITV’s News At Ten, he said: “I’d like a Downton film. I mean, I won’t be mysterious. If they decide to do it, I’ll certainly do it. I think it would be great.”

Downton Abbey's Julian Fellowes

Downton Abbey’s creator Julian Fellowes (Ian West/PA)

The final episode of Downton Abbey was the most watched TV show on Christmas Day in 2015.

Since its conclusion, there have been numerous reports about the possibility of a feature film.

Last year, it was reported that Fellowes was at work on a Downton-related TV drama called The Gilded Age for NBC Television. In an interview with The Mail On Sunday he said it would feature a younger version of Violet, the Dowager Countess, played in the original series by Maggie Smith.

Meanwhile, the writer, novelist and screenwriter has written a new ITV drama, Doctor Thorne, which is based on one of his favourite novels by the 19th-century writer Anthony Trollope. Starring Tom Hollander, Rebecca Front and Ian McShane, it starts on Sunday 6 March at 9.00pm.

Hugh Bonneville in Downton Abbey

Hugh Bonneville in Downton Abbey (ITV)

Hugh Bonneville, who starred as Lord Grantham, recently recalled being “absolutely terrified” while doing his first scene with Dame Maggie Smith on Downton Abbey.

The actor, 52, said he is already beginning to feel “nostalgic” following the end of the hit drama which was first broadcast in 2010. He said working alongside Dame Maggie, who played the Dowager Countess, made him raise his game.

Downton Abbey's Dame Maggie SmithDownton Abbey’s Dame Maggie Smith (ITV)

 

“I can remember the very first scene I did with her and I was absolutely terrified, and I think I can remember the last scene with her and I was absolutely terrified.

“She is the most astonishing actress. Her wit is legendary, as you say, and she doesn’t suffer fools. And you raise your game, you have to. It’s great acting opposite her because she’s got extremely high standards for herself and expects them of others,” he said on BBC Radio 4′s Desert Island Discs.