Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us – BBC2

In this week's episode of BBC2’s Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us, we meet a woman who took on the entire legal system to get justice

The second episode of BBC2’s Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us (9pm, see our TV Guide for full listings), about murder cases that have revolutionised crime detection and prosecution, tells the story of a woman who challenged the ancient law of double jeopardy.

Ann Ming’s daughter, 22-year-old Julie Hogg, was murdered in 1989 in Billingham, Teesside, and although Billy Dunlop later confessed while in prison for a different crime that he’d killed her, he’d already been tried and cleared and couldn’t stand trial again for the same crime.

Ann (pictured above), a truly remarkable woman, fought for 15 years to get justice for Julie and in 2006 Dunlop became the first person in 800 years to be charged with a crime of which he was previously acquitted. 

‘It was devastating,’ says Ann.

‘You had a man who you knew had killed your daughter and he was walking free.’

Mark Braithwaite Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us

Mark Braithwaite, the former detective who investigated Julie Hogg’s murder, in BBC2’s Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us

Ann refused to give up.

She wrote to the Law Commission and Home Secretary asking 
for a change in the law.

She even presented her case to the House of Lords.

MORE: Catch up with the first episode of Catching Britain’s Killers: The Crimes That Changed Us

The campaign paid off and Dunlop was found guilty of Julie’s murder at a retrial, making him the first person to be convicted under the newly reformed double jeopardy law.

‘Some days I think about Julie more than others,’ says Ann.

‘But time is a healer and I believe 
in life after death, so 
I know I’ll meet her again one day.’

TV Times rating: *****

NAV BUG FIX