Iain Glen returns to our screens as private investigator Jack Taylor on Channel 5 this Wednesday. We caught up with the versatile actor, now an internationally recognised star thanks to his role in Game of Thrones, to find out what’s in store for the Irish private eye in the new series…



We understand Jack has given up drink and is going to mass when we catch up with him in the new series?

“He’s trying very hard to turn over a new leaf! Like many a person who suffers from the demon drink there’s a part of him that really wants to escape it, and that’s where we find him at the beginning of the series.”



Does this mean he’s a changed man?

“It doesn’t really make him behave better! Because he’s missing it furiously, it probably makes him misbehave more than anything! The more complicated the case he’s working on becomes, the more he wants to turns to the booze. You’ll just have to see what unfolds!”



What can you tell us about the opening case in the new series?

“Jack enters the world of university life when an academic asks him to look into the bizarre death of a student who’s fallen to her death dressed as a character from a famous J.M. Synge play, Deirdre of the Sorrows. The crime is very odd and quirky, and quite grim.”



Has it been quite a physical role?

“I don’t want to give anything away, but Jack’s not averse to using violence, or the threat of it, to get someone to tell the truth! As always, he gets battered, bruised and broken bones!”



The series is based on the books of Irish writer Ken Bruen. Have you read them?

“I’ve read all the novels – more than once! During the course of filming the series I read only Jack Taylor novels. Ken’s a great writer of dialogue.”



You’ve managed to play a broad range of characters (Spooks, Downton Abbey, Prisoners’ Wives, Game of Thrones) during your career. Is it an actor’s dream come true?

“It’s what you hope for. I’ve been very lucky. I’ve never been hugely typecast since I started. I think theatre is part of the reason for that, being able to break out and do different roles. I’ve spread myself quite thin, but I’ve yet to be associated with a type of character, which I’m pleased about. Variety is definitely the spice of acting!”