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MasterChef returns for a new series, and the hunt is on for the country’s best amateur cook.

The BBC One series, presented and judged by John Torode and Gregg Wallace, promises to be even bigger and better than before as tens of thousands applied for the competition this year.

John and Gregg have the gargantuan task of tasting and judging a wide variety of dishes from 40 of the most skilful and talented applicants selected to face the cameras.

John Torode and Gregg Wallace in BBC One's MasterChef



BBC One’s MasterChef judges (BBC/Shine TV)

 

The first five hopefuls will begin by preparing the dish that best showcases their talent. The judges’ two favourites will move into the third round.

The three remaining contestants will face a sweet or savoury test, in which they will have an hour to create a dish using one of two trays of ingredients.

One person will leave the competition at this stage – the rest will then cook for some former MasterChef competitors.

 

The show’s old ‘cooking doesn’t get tougher than this’ catchphrase remains the case as it often gets just a little too hot in the kitchen for some hopefuls to handle.

But it’s all great entertainment for the watching millions. Here are seven reasons we’re glad to see the return of MasterChef.

 

1. Gregg pulls the most amazing faces

He has more expressions than all of the contestants put together.

 

2. Gregg’s one-liners can be so bizarre

“Ah, mate! That’s the sort of thing I would dip my head in.” This remains a classic Gregg-ism.

 

3. The innuendoes are hilarious

“Fifteen minutes late, Mitra finally gets her gnocchi out.” The Carry On team would be proud of that one.

 

4. Gregg is very amusing when he’s pompous

Gregg Wallace in MasterChef



Gregg Wallace in MasterChef (BBC/Shine TV)

 

“There’s no place in MasterChef for pink food. There’s no place in the world for pink food.”

 

5. Sob stories are rivalling The X Factor

It’s not just the onions making contestants cry these days, it seems. Everyone’s dream is to be a top chef and talking about their mission in life, and the journey they hope to go on, is enough to make the tears flow.

It can prompt a roll of the eyes, but it can also be very touching.

 

6. The fearful food journalists rule

This round, in which food critics are invited to taste the contestants’ dishes, is a firm favourite. The writers invariably make cutting remarks such as, “Lots of things here have died, including my hope,” and make the poor amateurs sweat buckets.

 

7. The fab memes on social media

 

Need we say more?

MasterChef series 12 premieres on BBC One at 8pm.