Samantha Morton has said she’ll never work for the BBC again if the Corporation fails to broadcast an emergency appeal for help in Gaza.

The 31-year-old actress – a Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee – led a string of celebrities at a London fundraiser for the British Aid Agency Medical Aid for Palestinians (MAP).

The Longford star, who appeared in the BBC’s production of The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, said she was embarrassed to earn money from a corporation that would take such an “horrific” and “disgusting” decision.

The BBC has decided not to show the appeal, saying it would compromise the Corporation’s impartiality.

But Samantha wanted to know how the appeal by the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) was different to Comic Relief or Children in Need.

“I’m shocked and appalled,” said the star. “I’ve worked for the BBC since I was a small child. As a public service they’ve got it very wrong. I’m not as articulate about this as I would like to be because I’m so appalled. I will never work for the BBC again unless they change their mind.”

She went on: “It’s very, very wrong. It’s not a political message. It’s about raising money for children who are dying.

“I’m proud to have worked for the BBC; I’m proud to be British; I’m proud we even have the BBC. But I need them to explain this decision. I reserve the right never to work for that company again if I feel that I’m too embarrassed to support them or earn money from them.”

The actress was speaking at a charity dinner organised by MAP at the Marriott Grosvenor House Hotel on Park Lane.

Later, comedian Mark Steel added that the idea that a televised appeal for help could be political was “just nuts”.

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